Our People - Nobel Laureates

Sir Harry Kroto, Robert Curl and Richard Smalley

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry Prize 1996

Sir Harry (BSc Chemistry 1961, PhD 1964) shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996 with Robert Curl and Richard Smalley for discovering a new form of carbon, known as "buckminsterfullerene", which stands alongside the two other well-defined forms, diamond and graphite.

 

Sir Richard Roberts and Phillip A. Sharp

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1993

Sir Richard (BSc Chemistry 1965, PhD 1968) shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1993 with Phillip Sharp for their discovery of "split genes", thereby disproving the long-held theory that genes in plants and animals were made up of continuous segments of DNA. This has important biological, medical and evolutionary consequences.

 

 

Lord Porter of Luddenham, Ronald Wreyford and Manfred Eigen

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1967

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1967 was divided, one half awarded to Manfred Eigen, the other half jointly to Lord Porter (Professor of Physical Chemistry 1955-66) and Ronald Wreyford for their discovery of flash photolysis, a technique which enabled chemists for the first time to measure the speed and mechanism of certain reactions that occurred too quickly for detection by conventional methods.

 

Sir Hans Krebs and Fritz Lipmann

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1953

Sir Hans (Lecturer in Pharmacology 1935-45, Professor of Biochemistry 1945-54) was a German-born physician and biochemist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1953 with Fritz Lipmann for his discovery of the citric acid cycle, since named the Krebs Cycle, which explains how life-giving energy is set free in cells by oxidation of glucose to carbon dioxide and water.

 

 

Lord Howard Florey, Sir Ernst Boris Chain and Sir Alexander Fleming

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1945

Lord Florey (Joseph Hunter Chair of Pathology 1932-35) was an Australian pharmacologist and pathologist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945 with Sir Ernst Boris Chain and Sir Alexander Fleming for the discovery of penicillin and its curative effect in various infectious diseases. Florey is regarded by the Australian scientific and medical community as one of its greatest scientists.