About CERN

Imagine taking part in the largest scientific experiment in the world. CERN needs more than physicists and engineers - if you're a student, a graduate, just starting your career or an experienced professional, whatever your field of expertise, CERN could be your next opportunity.

At CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, physicists and engineers are probing the fundamental structure of the universe. They use the world's largest and most complex scientific instruments to study the basic constituents of matter – the fundamental particles. The particles are made to collide together at close to the speed of light. The process gives the physicists clues about how the particles interact, and provides insights into the fundamental laws of nature.

The instruments used at CERN are purpose-built particle accelerators and detectors. Accelerators boost beams of particles to high energies before the beams are made to collide with each other or with stationary targets. Detectors observe and record the results of these collisions.

Founded in 1954, the CERN laboratory sits astride the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva. It was one of Europe's first joint ventures and now has 23 member states.

Could you be next to work at CERN? Take part.

Embarking on a new career journey at CERN: follow 4 newcomers as they discover the Organisation.

The name CERN

The name CERN is derived from the acronym for the French "Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire", or European Council for Nuclear Research, a provisional body founded in 1952 with the mandate of establishing a world-class fundamental physics research organisation in Europe. At that time, pure physics research concentrated on understanding the inside of the atom, hence the word "nuclear".

Today, our understanding of matter goes much deeper than the nucleus, and CERN's main area of research is particle physics – the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the forces acting between them. Because of this, the laboratory operated by CERN is often referred to as the European Laboratory for Particle Physics.

We work in the following sectors

  • Electronics
  • Energy
  • IT
  • Science
  • Scientific Research
  • Telecommunications

Employee Profiles

Fahim - Mechanical Engineer at CERN

"We are always doing and building things that no-one has done before."

Flory - Dutch Technician in CERN's Cryolab

"CERN is a fascinating place with brilliant people who, if you want, will to help you grow."
Meet more of our employees »
 

Watch our videos

Watch more of our videos »

More on our Hub

Over 2,600 students have Followed us on Gradcracker.
CERN recruit students across a range of computing and engineering disciplines.
The convention establishing CERN was ratified on 29 September 1954 by 12 countries in Western Europe.
The name CERN is derived from the acronym for the French "Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire".
The World Wide Web, invented at CERN in 1989 by British scientist Tim Berners-Lee, has grown to revolutionise communications worldwide.